10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

10. Avoiding replacing the roll

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

It would seem that there is no task more simple than replacing a used toilet roll with a new one. But people persist in forgetting to do this. As psychologists from New York University have found out, it's not about laziness, but the fact that the routine process does not promise any internal rewards (unless, of course, we are talking about petty-meticulous individuals). In order for a person to want to complete a task, it must satisfy three psychological needs: recognition of merit, independence, and belonging. Replacing the roll meets these criteria with a stretch.

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9. The desire to bite the baby

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

"So cute, so would eat!" - this phrase often breaks out in quite adequate adults at the sight of a baby, kitten, or puppy. Scientists have concluded that the smell of a newborn causes people (especially women) to release the pleasure hormone dopamine, and the same effect is produced by delicious food. "Minimise the" is associated with a pleasant aroma, and he, in turn, recalls the food. So the "saw a pretty thing — bite it" link is well-founded.

8. Inappropriate laughter

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

A fit of laughter at a funeral does not indicate our callousness or disrespect for the deceased. In fact, this is a sign of the deepest emotional stress, and our body uses laughter as a way to relieve tension. Similarly, a giggle when someone falls, slipping on a banana peel, is a signal that nothing terrible has happened.

7. Craving for psychopaths

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

What is the reason for mankind's insatiable interest in its most disgusting representatives? According to one version, watching a movie or reading a book about a psychopath temporarily frees you from a sense of responsibility and allows you to feel like someone who only thinks about himself. There is another explanation: psychopaths are a type of predator. Information about them evokes memories of primitive existence when a man was both a hunter and prey. With the help of a Thriller, we will be our primeval animal self, without putting ourselves in real danger.

6. Falsification of knowledge

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

Often people pretend to be knowledgeable about topics they haven't even heard of. But it is not always fair to accuse them of lying. When faced with an unexpected question, the brain begins to sift through information in search of an answer. This process creates a sense of awareness that has nothing to do with the actual state of things. Add to this public approval of enlightenment. And reaction: "Yes, I know!" will appear on its own.

5. Crying

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

Scientists refute popular wisdom: "Tears of grief will not help." Crying originated as a distress signal, which may have given humans an evolutionary advantage: silent tears, unlike screams, do not attract the attention of predators. Along with tears, the body produces the natural painkiller leucine-enkephalin, so after a bitter cry, relief usually comes.

4. Cramps during sleep

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

Hypnagogic twitching or sleepy convulsions occur in 70% of people. Some scientists believe that this is a natural component of the transition from wakefulness to sleep, during which the nerves misfire, confusing the two States. Another popular theory explains the spasms as an ancient reflex that prevented our Primate ancestors from relaxing too much and falling out of a tree.

3. Gossip

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

In more than 60% of cases, adults talk about third parties. And men spend 32% more time gossiping than women. The reason lies in the innate desire to connect with those who are nearby at the moment. And this need may be stronger than the moral obligation to the absent.

2. Passion for sad movies

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

Researchers from Ohio State University found that watching tragedies makes you think about your relationships with your loved ones, causes feelings of empathy, gratitude, and satisfaction with life. Sad movies increase the production of the hormone oxytocin, which is sometimes called the "moral molecule". It makes us more caring, noble, and compassionate.

1. Feeling awkward during silence

10 scientific explanations for the strangeness of our behavior

Like many other behavioral patterns, the mania for filling pauses with conversation goes back to the primal desire to belong to a group and fit in with it. When the thread of conversation is interrupted, there are doubts about their own importance and position in the group. And during a lively conversation, we feel social acceptance. Even if we are talking outright nonsense.